German Shepherd Corner

German Shepherd Not Listening Part One

Why is my German Shepherd Not Listening“Why is my German Shepherd not listening?

Have you ever asked yourself that question?

It’s a question all German Shepherd owners ask.

And it’s one I regularly answer emails about.

In short, the answer is over-stimulation impulse control…

Any situation where your dog is over-stimulated is stressful.  For both you and your GSD.

For example…

  • When you have to wait outside at the vet to avoid other dogs.
  • At the park you feel like a snow sleigh moving at 100 miles p/h behind a pack of dogs.
  • Having visitors over consists mainly of you apologizing for your unruly dog.

Granted, these are extreme scenarios.  Your German Shepherd might ignore a sit, down or come command.  In this case you’d work differently to resolve the issue.  I’ll share ways to work with this in a separate article.

In these extreme scenarios, you’re trying to get your dog’s attention.  But you get…

Zip, nothing and nada.

It’s in these moments you’ll find yourself asking that question…

“Why is my German Shepherd not listening?”

And “what can I do about it?”

I hate to be a kill-joy…

But it’s important for you to know that you’ll never stop over-stimulation for good.

But with patience and careful planning, you can do something about impulse control

Even in super exciting situations.

So before we get to the training plan to learn and teach this new and valuable skill…

I’ll just go into some detail about what goes on in your dog’s head when he’s just not listening.

Get this right, you’ll get inside your German Shepherd’s head.  It won’t only help to calm any situation.

It will definitely open up your training sessions.

Pushed to The Limits

Your dog has a threshold.  It’s his level of tolerance for certain things.

It’s the level between calm and relaxed and out of control.

Out of control could be excitement, fear, aggression, anxiety etc.

Think of his threshold on a scale from 1 to 10.  1 being asleep and 10 being totally out of control.

The optimal threshold is somewhere between 2 and 4 or 5, that’s when your dog is calm, relaxed and it’s easy to get his focus.

6 and up is total over-stimulation.

According to Mardi Richmond in the Whole Dog Journal – your dog moves from one emotional state to another.  This is called crossing the threshold.

This is also a brilliant article about a dog named Daisy and her owner Mel.  And how they both worked to raise her thresholds.

Click – Click, Bang!

My German Shepherd is not ListeningYour GSD also has a trigger.

Triggers are the things that cause a reaction in your dog.

Triggers raise your dog’s threshold.

They can be things like other dogs, people, toys, play, sounds and chaos etc.

So, for example…

Your GSD sees another dog – that’s the trigger.

Suddenly there’s a low growl in the back of his throat.  His heckles are raised and he’s staring.

Fixated…

That’s him moving through the scales of his threshold.  His reaction will depend on how strong the trigger is.

At this point, you could dangle a medium rare steak in front of your pooch and you won’t get his attention.

I found this excellent visual resource online with explains the process perfectly.

 

A Dog's Threshold Explained

Now you’re wondering what to do with this new information and how to apply it to training your GSD…

Here’s how I think you can work with your dog and teach him to control his threshold…

Impulse Control

In essence you are going to teach impulse control.

I’ll get to that later.

Focus

Teach Focus - German Shepherd Not ListeningThe first step is to teach your GSD to focus when you ask for it…

Start someplace with very little distraction.

Later, you’ll move to more challenging scenarios with more distractions.

Dogs are context-bound.  Understanding this is another secret to build a solid dog-owner relationship.

Context bound means your GSD will sit 98% of the time in the kitchen.  But, only 65% of the time in the lounge.

You counter this by only moving to a new area once your dog is reliable with the behavior.

No-force, positive reinforcement training is the best way to teach a dog anything.

So…

Whether you use a clicker or a verbal marker stick to it.  I have written an article about clicker/marker training here.

It Won’t Come Cheap

You’ll need high value treats for this training.

I know you’re thinking, “why can’t I use regular treats?”

You’ll use it in high energy situations.

So, you really need him to be 100% reliable when you ask for focus.

If you want to know how to get your dog to show you which treats are most valuable to him, check out my article on Dog Learning here.

It’s long, so just skip to the part headed The Power of Food in Dog Learning.

Here’s How You Do It…

  • Get him into a sit and let him know you have a treat in your hand – he’ll stay focused on the treat.
  • Move you hand up to your face between your eyes.  He’ll watch your treat hand like a hawk.

I use my index finger pointing up with the tip right at the bridge of my nose.

  • Let your eyes lock with your dog’s and immediately mark the eye contact with a reward.

The signal you use here is important because it’s the hand signal for focus, when there are no treats.

So pick a signal that’s comfortable for you and stick with it.

A bonus to a reliable focus is, your dog will start looking to you for guidance in a situation he is unsure of.

Add The Cue

Adding a Cue - German Shepherd Not Listening

The word you choose, is the sound your dog will understand to mean all-eyes-on-you.

So don’t change it.

If you do, your dog will never learn what you want from him.

I use ‘eyes’.  But it could be ‘look’, ‘focus’ or anything else.

Gauge your GSD’s progress.  And only add a cue when he’s reliable.

Each dog is different but I’d say within 4 training sessions he’ll have grasped the behavior.

Work on duration

For example…

Treat him only after 3 seconds of eye contact.

Then 5 seconds.

Then 7 seconds.

Then 10 seconds.

Go slow over the period of a week or so.

If he gives you 3 seconds on a 5 second training session, Go back to 3 seconds for the rest of the session.

Taking baby steps or a few steps back is not failure.

It’s setting your dog up for success.

Oh, and don’t forget to work on distance too.

Fade the Treats

When this focus and duration are reliable. Start fading the rewards.

In the article on Dog Learning, there is a section on fading treats it’s under the heading Reinforcement Schedules.

Generalize in Different Scenarios

Challenge your GSD by moving to different rooms with more distractions. Move outside when he’s reliable.

Generalize in as many different places as you can.

Counter Conditioning and Desensitizing

This part of the training plan is important.

In essence your dog will learn that good things happen when they are around or in something stressful.

This is the impulse control I mentioned earlier.  Read about Counter Conditioning and Desensitization here.

In the article there’s a very helpful visual description of counter conditioning.

It works great for fearful, reactive and over excited dogs.

Putting it all Together

Ideally, you want your dog to be desensitized and calm in as many situations as possible.

But, like us humans…

This is not always possible.  You and your pooch will come across people, dogs and situations you don’t like.

So here’s the scenario…Generalize Training - German Shepherd Not Listening

You visit the local dog park for a game of fetch.

And you come across an abrasive dog that instantly rubs your GSD up the wrong way.

If your dog reacts, you both have the focus skill mastered!

Now you can easily draw his attention to you and nip the tension in the bud.

Just a few more points to motivate you, the trainer…

  • Start small.
  • Gradually increase difficulty.
  • Flow with the session.  Change this up if you notice your dog checking out.
  • Give ‘jackpot’ treats for excellent work.  It builds motivation.
  • Acknowledge small victories.
  • Be consistent, for several weeks if necessary.

I hope this solution answers your question, “why is my German Shepherd not listening?”

Feel free to leave your thoughts, questions and specific scenarios you may be struggling with, in the comments below.

21 comments… add one

  • Delisa Merritt

    He doing really good with set,heal,lay. But I can’t stop him from jumping on us, and herding us. I’ve tried blocking him, walking against walls so he can’t go around me. I’ve tried the knee when he jumps. Help.

    • Hi Delisa,

      Thank you for sharing your situation here.

      Jumping up is a behavior that can mostly be attributed to a dog crossing his threshold. You don’t say in what kind of scenarios he jumps but he might be excited to see you, visitors, a toy or food.

      I know some trainers promote the methods you mentioned but in my opinion none of them work to resolve the issue – as you have experienced for yourself. It’s only no-force, positive reinforcement will get to the root and resolve it.

      Dealing with jumping needs an article all of its own, but here’s how I think you should work with your boy…

      The key is to teach your GSD all 4’s on the floor. You want to avoid him jumping. But if he does jump, turn your body away from him. Turn your face away too. Walk away if you can. And give him no attention until all his paws are firmly on the ground.

      But ideally you want to stop the jumping before it happens.

      So, until your boy is 100% reliable in not jumping I suggest you carry a bunch of treats around with you. Each time you are near your dog and he has all 4’s on the floor, drop a few treats. He has to be standing firm on the ground to eat the treats – which reinforces him to keep his paws on the ground. You can do this if he’s walking or standing next to you or at any time you see him standing firmly on the ground.

      If your boy jumps when he’s happy to see you, sees toys or food you need to anticipate the jump before it happens. So even before he thinks about jumping you should be ready with treats. Watch his body language and facial expressions. You’ll know when he’s about to jump. Make sure he has all 4’s on the floor and drop some treats.

      If you treat him even if he has one paw of the ground you’ll be rewarding his jumping – so be mindful of this.

      Get started with this as soon as possible because your boy is going to grow into a large strong adult. Please reply here with any questions you have once you get started with the training.

      Chat soon,
      Rosemary

  • Heidi

    Hi

    I am trying to get my GSP use to riding in my truck she is 5months on the 21st and drools heavy what do u suggest? She loves ice I’ve been slowly getting her use to the riding started 5days not running the truck then a few running & not driving then and now driving keeping her in a doggy seat belt. Still heavy drooling. I can’t wait till she loves riding with us. Tia and her name is Daisy 😄

    • Hi Heidi!

      Thanks for sharing your situation here.

      It sounds like Daisy has a case of motion sickness.

      Just like us humans, some dogs have it and some don’t.

      You’re definitely on the right track with your method of conditioning her.

      The trick with any dog training is to take really small steps, as you are doing now. But at the same time if you see she’s struggling, then take a few steps back and go forward even slower. So take what you’re doing now and break it down into even smaller steps.

      It’s especially helpful with motion sickness to go real slow.

      So for example, just spend a week backing in and out of your driveway with Daisy in your truck.

      Then move on to driving just to the end of your road for a few weeks.

      Then take it further to a drive around the corner to the next stop and back for a few weeks.

      Then try a drive around the block once a day for a few weeks.

      Let me know how you get on with this, if you’ve got questions just come back here and leave them in the comments. I always answer within 12 hours.

      Good luck, and say ‘hi’ to Daisy from me. :)

  • mary

    Hi I have a one year old male German shepherd he has mastered basic training his recall is great pulling on lead is getting there slowly.
    However he is braking at visitors to the home and also people in street/cafes etc who approach us he will calm down after a while but it can be quiet alarming and not behaviour we want. Do you have any ideas on this. Any help at all would be greatly appreciated.
    Many thanks

    • Hi Mary!

      Thanks for sharing your situation here.

      Let me just say that recall is one of the most difficult habits to teach a dog. And the fact that your boy is so reliable confirms what you already know. He’s a bright boy!

      From what you’ve described I can tell your boy crosses his threshold in situations where people enter into what he considers his personal space. Just like humans, dogs also have a ‘bubble’ around them which they feel safe in. His trigger is people entering his ‘bubble’.

      Chaos could also be a trigger. You might not experience the situations in which he has a barking session as chaotic, but your German Shepherd might.

      Spend some time to really understand the threshold and trigger concepts in this article. This knowledge will help you in all situations to know what’s going on inside your boy’s head. And it’ll be easier for you to identify triggers in his life.

      You don’t say whether he’s intact or not, but sometimes intact males can exhibit more territorial behavior than say a neutered male or a female.

      Don’t be discouraged, you can work with this and help your boy be more comfortable and confident in these kinds of situations. It will take time. And you will need the help of friends, family and eventually strangers.

      First, I have to ask whether you are trying to shush him up when he starts barking? If you are, your first step is to stop. Trying to quiet him down in the middle of a barking session will not stop him. And, it also reinforces his behavior.

      In a situation where you’re working to recondition a behavior taking a few steps back is the best move you can make. In this case, taking a few steps back will be starting right back in your home.

      Here’s what I would do if I were in your shoes…

      First thing is to help your boy become comfortable with guests visiting your home.
      Next thing would be to get him comfortable with passing people just outside your home.
      After that the dog park.
      And then only start exposing him to more challenging situations like at a cafe, a busy high street or even a bus or the underground.

      This is called desensitizing and counter conditioning – using treats as rewards.

      Start by asking a friend or family member to get involved in his training. Set up a training session where your chosen person will come over for a visit.
      You’ve got to know exactly when and what triggers your boy.
      Is it the sound of tyres on the gravel driveway?
      Or the opening gate?
      Is it the sound of footsteps? Is it the sound of the doorbell or a knock at the door?

      Whichever it is, that’s the trigger you should start desensitizing your dog to.

      It’s useful to keep in contact with the visitor via your mobile. You need to know exactly when that trigger is coming.

      And your timing must be perfect. If you offer treats when he’s given even one bark, you’re rewarding him for barking.

      Before your boy even thinks about barking or growling offer him treats. Because you’re desensitizing him offer a bunch of rewards at a time.

      Keep doing this until he’s totally comfortable with the sound that triggers it all. You might need to do this over a week or weeks. Depending on how quickly he becomes comfortable.

      Next get your visitor to come inside. Here a nice trick is to give your guest treats to reward your boy for allowing him/her into the house without barking.

      Once he’s comfortable with that the next step is to go outside. Preferably just outside your house on the pavement.

      Ask a few friends or family to walk towards you and your dog as though they are strangers. Again keep focused on his body language and facial expressions. Before he even thinks about barking offer him treats.

      Keep doing this until he’s happy and comfortable with people walking up to you and him.

      The method will be the same as you move to more and more challenging situations.

      I’d like to suggest you read this article and concentrate on how to get your boy to show you which treat he values the most. Use those in this training. Also, have a look at the graphic on desensitizing and counter conditioning in this article.

      If you have any more questions just come back here and leave them in the comments. I answer within 12 hours. And I’d love to know how you get on. So please share your experience here too.

      Chat soon,
      R

  • Rick

    Hello!

    I’m so happy I just came across your website!

    I’m new to owning German Shepherds and my girl Tinker is 6 months old. She does this thing where she ignores me flat – like I don’t exist.

    I can see her ears moving to listen to the sound of my voice, but she doesn’t respond my coming to me or even looking at me.

    I’m staring to think she does it on purpose. What can I do?

    Thanks

    • Hi Rick,

      Thanks for sharing.

      Well, it sounds like Tinker has the typical aloof trait that they are well known for. Although their aloofness is usually towards strangers, they can exhibit this with their owners too.

      There are a whole bunch of reasons Tinker could be doing this…

      GSD’s are highly intelligent and fast learners.

      She might just be tired after a long day of play and training.
      Also, if you’re not using a variable reward structure during training she’ll quickly learn that when you have no rewards for her she won’t respond. That’s not her doing it on purpose though.
      If you’ve over used a command, it becomes meaningless and this will cause Tinker to ignore it.

      What you’re experiencing is the subject of part two of the ‘Why is my German Shepherd not listening’ series.

      I’ll drop you a heads up here when it’s available for reading.

      Chat soon,
      R

  • Hello
    We recently adopted a GSD. We have had her for 3 weeks now. She is 5 years old. Her name is Betty. She is EVERYTHING and then some that we wanted in our adopted new family member.

    I’m home with her the majority of the time, and I do the majority of the walking, feeding and obviously I spend a lot of time with her. Betty listens well. She came trained. She knows basic commands and listens for the most part. There are a few questions I have; First, at times when she is laying down, she completely ignores me or anyone in the family when we call her name. She doesn’t even move her head to look at us. Is there something I/we can do to get her attention, or is this just her wanting to rest?

    Betty also does not like small dogs, there is zero tension on the leash when I walk her. I’m working with her to walk by my side and not ahead of me, however she was an outside dog for the most part, and walking on a leash was not something she did easily. However, when we come across small dogs, she is so focused on the small dog. I keep moving along and I use the same commands with her. If she tugs a bit, I give her a quick tug and tell her “easy”, then she slows back, but I’d like to know what I can do when we come across small Dogs? She seems to be completely focused on the small dog and I give her another tug and use the command “move along”, she will move along but then always looks back and I have to say the command about 4-5 times but by that time the small dog has passed. How do I get her to not be so focused on small dogs? Betty does not have this behavior with bigger dogs unless the other dog starts barking and going crazy. I can see the other dog owners feed in to this behavior with their dog, but I don’t want Betty to have the same behavior. If the other dog moves along, Betty moves along.

    So my questions would be: how do we get her to listen when she is called? How do we get her to not be so focused on small dogs, and how do I keep her moving along if another dog is barking and growling at her/us? And lastly, how do I get her to walk by my side?

    I’m finding your website helpful and very interesting.

    Thank you,
    Niki

    • Hi Niki!

      Betty sounds like a lovely girl! You’re blessed that she came trained, this is especially true for older dogs that mostly lived outside.

      Although German Shepherds are highly trainable, they are also well known for their aloof nature. Both my German Shepherds, Charley and Zè can be aloof at times. I find it’s usually during the hottest times of the day, after a very physical game of fetch or tug and after they’ve had their evening meal. But sometimes it’s just because they want to rest, just like you say.

      Some people see this as a bad thing, but I don’t think it’s bad at all. In this respect I think dogs are a lot like us. I mean, if my phone rings while I’m chilling and I don’t want to speak to someone, I just let it ring through to voicemail. So, as long as Betty is responding to recalls and most other times you have nothing to worry about.

      In terms of her fixation on small dogs, the quickest and easiest way to break her focus is to turn and walk in the opposite direction. So basically start (start your walk), stop (stop when you cross paths with a small dog and she reacts), change direction (immediately change direction). Once you’ve changed direction and walked a few steps and she’s no longer focused on the smaller dog, give her a few food rewards. Another thing I’d suggest is not to tug back on the leash when she pulls. Although it might work in the short term, dogs usually pull harder. So here, the start, stop, change direction is also a good method.

      Heeling is pretty easy if Betty is already walking lose leash. If she’s not, the start, stop, change direction and not pulling back on her leash will make that happen over time. For the heel training keep a short leash and Betty on the side you want her to walk. Pick a side and stick to it. This method will keep her close to you for heeling. Pay her with food rewards for keeping by your side. If she pulls ahead, withold rewards, stop and change direction. Then try again. When she’s reliably heeling you can start adding the cue ‘heel’. Once she’s heeling to the cue you need to phase out rewards. It’s important to do this as soon as she’s reliable or she’ll begin to expect treats and she won’t heel unless there are rewards.

      To get more info on phasing out rewards and also how Betty learns check out my article on how dogs learn. It’s long but worth the read.

      I hope this helps. Let me know if you have other questions, I’m happy to help.

      Chat soon.

  • Clare

    I have a 13 week old pup and she is biting non stop. I’ve tried yelping and moving away, letting my hand go still and also saying no and ignoring for a short while. Nothing seems to work. She is getting to be a big girl now and her mouthing hurts a lot. Apart from this she is amazing. Sits, lies down, gives paw and rings the bell to go out. Any advice on how I can stop the biting would be wonderful

    • Hi Clare,

      At 13 weeks your pup is still a baby and biting is natural. But it’s good that you want to get it under control before she grows into a large and powerful dog. Please check out this article on biting. It describes 4 games you can use to teach your pup that biting limbs is off limits.

  • Ali

    Hello,

    I have a intact 7.5 month old male gsd. He is so smart and gets whatever I teach him in 3 repetitions. He knows most commands in 2 languages.

    My problem is;

    He gets over-excited when he sees another dog during our walks and starts bark at them like say ” Heeeeeyyy, I am here ” and wants to go near them, and whenever he can’t go, he starts crying and barking more.

    We started to basic obedience group class and I thought it might be helpful to train around other dogs but he still does same so trainer gave me prong collars which I am reluctant to use because I read it might lead dog aggression when he associate the pain with another dog.

    One last thing, he has defensive barking lately to other dogs who barks at him defensively as well. If other dog doesn’t bark or ignores him, he has his regular bark.

    Thanks for help already

    • Hi Ali!

      Thanks for stopping by and your comment.

      Firstly, you’re 100% correct not to use a prong collar. It can and does cause dog aggression. And if you use it to ‘fix’ this situation your boy will begin to associate other dogs with the discomfort the prong collar causes which is not good. And you’ll end up with more problems than anything else. Re-training a dog that’s dog reactive is a long road, so avoid it at all costs.

      Secondly, ditch your trainer if you want to use only force-free, kind methods. I don’t want to bad mouth your trainer as a person, but as far as training methods go, a prong collar is not the most effective way.

      So, you’ve read this article and have an understanding of triggers and thresholds. Now you’ll need to start working with your boy to teach him to control his impulses.

      I really believe teaching focus is the first step. If there’s no focus, you won’t be able to do anything to calm your boy in situations like you’ve described above. It’s a process and it takes time, but it works. And the results are long lasting. And he’s already proven to you that he’s super smart and learns quickly.

      So, start with focus, then move on to desensitizing and reconditioning and then your boy will be in the right head space to learn the rules of engagement with other dogs. There’s a link in the article to the steps on desensitizing and reconditioning too.

      Please feel free to come back here and ask questions as you’re going through this training. I’m happy to help.

      Rosemary

  • Hi Valentine!

    Thanks for your question.

    I’m not sure what your girl’s previous potty training experience was before she came into your life, but it sounds to me like you’ll need to potty train her.

    You can follow the tips in my article on how to potty train a German Shepherd puppy.

    Also, I recommend checking out my Flawless Potty Training Guide for German Shepherd Dogs. It’s a method I’ve used for over 10 years. And if you check out the comments on the potty training post you’ll see loads of people have had success with it too. You’ll also get direct access to me to support you along the way to getting a 100% reliable pup. Who goes where you want and lets you know when she wants.

    I hope this helps,
    Rosemary

  • Jo Howie

    Hi Rosemary,

    Just found this website and I love it. Our GSD, Kiara, is 13 weeks and my partner’s grandma has raised them but it is my first GSD. She’s a beautiful dog. We’ve had no problems introducing her to other dogs or walking loose lead, she can focus when another dog walks past. However, we have a cat and that pushes her thresholds higher than anything. She pins the cat via the neck to the floor, which I noted is what they were trained to do to sheep. I want to break this behaviour asap before she is too big and accidently hurts the cat. Her jackpot treat is boiled chicken and the dog and cat can sit next to each other happily when I have chicken in my hand. But if I’m not watching and the cat walks/runs past she goes him and often won’t let go even if I grab the chicken. We’re trying to teach ‘leave it’ before she gets to the cat but when she’s too excited it doesn’t work. Any tips you can help with?
    Thanks
    Jo

    • Hi Jo!

      Thanks for your question.

      It’s nice to see you have a firm grip on the triggers and thresholds! Kiara and your cat are lucky to have you!

      So I totally agree that this is something you must nip in the bud before it turns into an accident.

      I’ve go a sort guide I put together for another reader her at GSC which I’d like to email to you. It’s way too long to put in a comment. Just so I am within the privacy parameters, just give me a quick reply here and let me know it’s okay for me to use the email address you used on the site. As soon as I get the go ahead from you, I’ll send it over via email.

      Chat soon,
      Rosemary

      P.S. I’m so pleased you love the site! :)

      • Joanne Howie

        The email would be fantastic thanks Rosemary :)

        • Hi Joanne,

          I went ahead and turned the guide into a blog post for the site. Hopefully, it’ll help other pet parents in the same boat.

          Hope you don’t mind that I quoted your question?!

          Let me know if you have questions once you get started. Just drop them in the comments on the post page.

          Here’s the link: How to Train a German Shepherd to Like Cats.

          Chat soon.

  • Lisa hussey

    Hi Rosemary,
    I am so glad i found your website. This is my 1st GSD and she is 5 months old. I have 3 young kids as well. Just from reading this article you have shown me that she has crossed her threshold when she starts biting and nipping at the kids. What would your advice be for tackling this problem? Should i take the kids away or Sprocket. Any advice will be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks Lisa

    • Hi Lisa!

      Glad you’re finding value here!

      Kiddies get pups super excited! They are more similar in height, they move quickly and they have the most fun voices. All those things together are the best thing ever for a puppy!

      I recommend limiting Sprocket’s access to your kids unless you’re actively involved and only allow her to interact with one of your young ones at a time. This is not a long term strategy, but only until Sprocket has learned that your kid’s and their limbs are out of bounds when it comes to her teeth.

      During this controlled interaction I really recommend starting with bite inhibition games. I’ve written about 4 that I recommend. I don’t recommend the yelping technique anymore because it just makes pups more excieted.

      You can check out the biting games in this article.

      In terms of the games, start with the build-a-bridge game. It’s such a simple game but it’s very powerful. People often overlook how much power this game has because it’s so simple. It teaches pups to have human limbs in close proximity to their mouths without biting. You should supervise and show your children exactly how this game works and let them work with Sprocket on it one at a time.

      If she’s nipping and biting at you too, I suggest using the same game too. Leave the other 3 games for now. They will come in handy later IF there are anymore biting frenzies after she’s mastered the build-a-bridge game.

      The build-a-bridge game is especially useful to lower that threshold.

      I’m around if you have other questions.

      Also, come and join my private facebook group. You can do this by signing up for ‘Dog Speak’ and you’ll get a link in the first email to the group.

      I’m online most days to answer questions. We share our experiences and funny photos and videos of our dogs and their antics. It’s a growing community of GSD owners from all over the world and everyone has great advice and tips too.

      Hope to see you on the inside!

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